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Top 10 CRM definitions and buzzwords of 2007

2007 was a big year for wireless technology, Web-based applications and the customer experience, as organizations focused on cutting costs, adopting new technology and expanding their customer base. Browse our collection of the hottest CRM definitions and buzzwords of 2007 and get an overview of the past year's CRM trends.

2007 was a big year for wireless technology, Web-based applications and the customer experience, as organizations focused on cutting costs, adopting new technology and expanding their customer base. Browse our collection of the hottest CRM definitions and buzzwords of 2007 and get an overview of the past year's CRM trends.

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Table of Contents

Top 10 CRM definitions and buzzwords of 2007
1. Mobile VPN
2. Virtual call center
3. Business process outsourcing (BPO)
4. Personalization
5. Second Life
6. Mash-up
7. E-support
8. Graphical user interface
9. Chat and text messaging abbrevations
10. Wikinomics

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Top 10 CRM definitions and buzzwords of 2007

A mobile VPN is a network configuration where mobile devices such as notebook computers or PDAs connect to a virtual private network (VPN) or intranet while moving from one physical location to another. A mobile VPN connection allows users continuous service while switching across multiple technologies and networks. Mobile VPN technology became more popular in 2007 as more and more users began connecting wirelessly with mobile devices.

  • Listen to a podcast on best practices for mobile CRM.

    A virtual call center is made up of representatives who are located in different locations around the globe. Virtual call center employees may be found in a number of smaller centers, but most work from their own homes. The benefits of the virtual call center are two-fold: employees working from home enjoy flexible hours, dress code and no commute, while the organization saves on housing and equipment costs. Virtual call centers increased in popularity this year as organizations looked for ways to cut costs while improving customer satisfaction. This trend was also driven by technology (such as VoIP) that allows organizations to better track and monitor remote agents.

  • Read about how virtual call centers are driving VoIP adoption.

    Business process outsourcing (BPO) refers to the contracting of a specific business task, such as payroll, to a third-party service provider. BPO is most often implemented to cut costs on tasks that are required but do not play a part in helping a company maintain their position in the marketplace. Many companies have turned to BPO in 2007, in part because on-demand CRM applications have made it so easy for any party in a company's network to access and share information, regardless of location.

  • Learn more about the advantages of business process outsourcing with on-demand CRM.

    Personalization, also known as one-to-one marketing, is the process of tailoring pages on a Web site to individual users' characteristics or preferences. Personalization is often used to increase customer satisfaction, e-commerce sales and the likelihood of repeat visits. This market trend was big in 2007, as businesses pushed to improve the customer experience.

  • Read about how current trends such as personalization are affecting marketing strategies.

    Second Life is set in a 3-D virtual world created by software maker Linden Labs. Users, or "residents," create avatars to represent themselves and interact with one another. There is a multitude of entrepreneurial activity in Second Life, as users create and sell a wide variety of virtual commodities. Some vendors have set up virtual businesses in Second Life, and the virtual world holds endless possibilities for marketers looking to connect with their customers in a new, different way.

  • Read an article about how Second Life may affect CRM.

    A mash-up is a Web page or application that blends complementary elements from multiple sources. For example, Flash Earth is a mash-up of Google Maps and Microsoft's Virtual Earth. Mash-ups are created by using Ajax, and reflect the recent shift towards a more interactive, user-defined Web.

  • Find out how mash-ups will be used in Oracle's Fusion and Web 2.0 applications.

    E-support is an electronic (usually Web-based) version of customer service. E-support is a cost-effective, efficient way for companies to offer customers around-the-clock support. Most Web sites offer a combination of e-support types (static information, interactive self-help, live interaction support and toll-free customer support), which range from least to most expensive. In 2007, many call centers relied on e-support as a way of improving customer service while cutting costs by steering customers away from the phone line.

  • Learn how e-support is creating challenges in the call center.

    A graphical user interface (GUI) is everything that a user interacts with online -- you are looking at the GUI of your Web browser right now. Applications tend to use elements of the GUI that comes with their operating system and add their own elements as they see fit. In 2007, vendors started to pay more attention to the usability of their products and updated their GUI to try to edge out competition.

  • Read an article about how SAP is enhancing its user interface with CRM 2007.

    Chat and text messaging abbreviations were used across the globe in 2007 -- in emails, instant messages and text messages between cell phone users. In the CRM realm, this lingo is particularly useful for call center agents using online chat and sales representatives using mobile CRM technology. These abbreviations enable users to get their point across quickly while on-the-go.

  • Learn how Subway is using mobile marketing to reach customers.

    Wikinomics is a Web 2.0 phenomenon that describes the effects of collaboration and user-participation on the marketplace and corporate world. The term comes from the word "wiki," a server program that allows users to collaborate and generate content on the Web, and "economics." This past year, companies began deploying wikis on their Web sites as it became clear that there were ways to make money by using them.

  • Test your knowledge of wikis and Web 2.0 with the Web 2.0 and CRM quiz.

  • Dig Deeper on Marketing automation

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